Archives for photography

UCSF Job

Last year, the Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics at the University of California San Francisco hired me to shoot portraits of its faculty members for a website overhaul. It was a fun job, and I particularly enjoyed many of the conversations I had with the scientists. Although I finished the job in March 2015, I’m only now getting around to posting selected portraits and “B-roll”.
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Categories: photography and science.

Hitting the Jacksmelt

Reviewing the San Francisco Bay tide tables last Monday, I noted early afternoon high tide numbers for the weekend and asked two buddies if they had any interest in chasing herring in the North Bay. They did, and yesterday afternoon, at Point Tiburon’s Elephant Rock Pier, we failed to find herring but made the acquaintance of Pacific jacksmelt aplenty. There’s something about getting into a school of “forage fish” that turns you into a 12-year-old, and a soft-spoken local teenager who fished alongside us with rod and reel could only gawk at the three man-children with their cast nets and
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Categories: California, fish, natural history, and photography.

Tytia Habing's Quiet Praise

After recently being introduced to photographer Tytia Habing“s series, “The Gift” (via Emma Kisiel“s terrific Muybridge”s Horse), I added Habing”s blog to the Hungry Hyaena blogroll. Jaded types might consider Habing”s work sentimental to the brink of preciousness, but I find her pictures to be quiet, evocative celebrations of the interconnectivity of everything — of the humbling fact that each mote is indivisible from the whole. In photographs of a gardener”s gloves overflowing with tobacco hornworms or a picture of Habing”s son taking cover in a low forest of mayapple, Habing”s earnest appreciation for, in her words, “this good earth
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Categories: art, my art, photography, and wonder.

Photoshoot at Congregation Beth Sholom

This past Thursday evening, I shot another event at Congregation Beth Sholom in San Francisco. The San Francisco Ceremony to Honor the Forgotten Refugees was a program organized by JIMENA (Jews Indigenous to the Middle East and North Africa). JIMENA”s mission is “to ensure that the accurate history of Mizrahi and Sephardic Jews is incorporated into mainstream Jewish and Middle Eastern narratives in order to create balance in attitudes, narratives, and discourse about Middle Eastern refugees and the modern Jewish experience.”
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Categories: Jewish life, Judaism, and photography.

Decoy model in Gray’s Sporting Journal

Earlier this month, when one of my photographs led a Bay Nature article that also included a reference to the work of my uncle, conservation historian John Reiger, I wrote that I was delighted to find “two generations of Reiger work appearing in the same feature.” Three weeks later, and it has happened again…although this occasion is less of a surprise. A photo of mine is used as the opening spread of “Allure of Decoys,” an article written by my father, George Reiger, that appears in the November/December issue of Gray’s Sporting Journal.
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Categories: art, birds, Eastern Shore of Virginia, hunting, and photography.

Hunting & conservation in Bay Nature

The opening spread of “View From the Blind,” an article by Aleta George in the October-December issue of Bay Nature features a photograph that I took at dawn during a December 2013 duck hunting outing near Robbins, California. George’s excellent piece highlights the critical role hunters played during the inception of the American conservation movement, and also introduces readers to a handful of contemporary hunter-conservationists in the Bay Area.
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Categories: California, conservation, and photography.

A Santa Cruz Island weekend

On a Friday morning in early September, I was awakened by the hoarse calls of a great blue heron and the barking of a California sea lion. I found the juxtaposition disorienting. Great blues and sea lions aren’t animals I associate with one another. Half asleep, it took several seconds for me to recall that I was in the berth of a sailboat docked near Oxnard, California, where it’s perfectly natural for the two species to keep company in the predawn twilight. Because my formative years were spent in Tidewater Virginia and my 20s and early 30s in the boroughs
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Categories: California, conservation, fish, invasive species, mammals, natural history, photography, sharks, and writing.

L’shanah tovah!

This past Saturday night, I shot the Hardly Strictly Selichot event at Congregation Beth Sholom in San Francisco. The Israeli-born, Los Angeles-based band Moshav performed. While the event was above all a concert, Moshav’s setlist opened with a rousing havdalah, the ceremony marking the end of Shabbat, the Jewish Sabbath, and later incorporated recitation of selichot, penitental poems associated with Jewish fast days and the period of teshuvah (return or repentance) that proceeds the Yamim Noraim, which literally translates as the Days of Awe but are more commonly called the High Holy Days in the United States. With Rosh Hashanah
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Categories: Jewish life, Judaism, and photography.